Keynotes

Keynotes

Maureen Dollard

Maureen Dollard

The politics of research; the Russian doll view of work and organisational psychology in society

Summary

Work and organisational psychology must be seen in context; employers and employees, work in jobs in organisations and in society. Taking the issue of the balance of worker health and productivity as a focal point this keynote will explore the multilevel nature of influences on behaviour at work, and critically review the dominant focus on the individual in knowledge development in the discipline. Evidence supporting the expansion of theory and research to include national influences (e.g., culture, societal beliefs, legislation and regulation, corruption, welfare regimes, union representation, and the media) and other external influences (e.g. regional socio-demographics) will be explored.

The political and contextual nature of work and organisational psychology knowledge is particularly salient in applied research and trying to bridge the research - practice gap. Politics concerns who gets what power and resources, how much, and when. In whose interest does our research serve? The conflict between the imperatives of science and the requirements of end users requires a delicate balancing act from the formulation of the research question, methods and measures used, and interpretation and application of the results. These conflicts are redoubled when the tensions of end users interests are considered (managers, shareholders, employee representatives). Rethinking the goal of research and uncovering the driving values will help us to imagine and construct the kind of society we would like to live in.

About Maureen Dollard

Prof Maureen Dollard is Professor of Work and Organisational Psychology and Director of the Asia Pacific Centre for Work Health and Safety and the Work & Stress Research Group at the University of South Australia. Her main research focus is on multilevel models for worker health, psychosocial safety climate for psychological health in organisations, and interventions for psychosocial risk, and she has published numerous books and papers in the area. She established the national surveillance project, the Australian Workplace Barometer, has extensive experience with industry partners, and has won numerous research grants awarded by the Australian Research Council. Maureen is on the Editorial Board for the international journals Work and Stress, Journal of Organizational Behavior, the European Journal of Work & Organisational Psychology, and the advisory board for the International Journal of Rural Management. She is Co-chair of the International Commission on Occupational Health Scientific Committee Work Organisation and Psychosocial Factors and was Chair of the 2014 Congress of the International Commission on Occupational Health – Work Organization and Psychosocial Factors. She is President-Elect of the Asia Pacific Academy for Psychosocial Factors at Work.


Rob Briner ID Photo 2014

Rob Briner

How evidence-based is work and organizational psychology? Why does it matter and what can we do about it?

Summary

The idea of evidence-based practice is now very well-known in many areas of professional practice including medicine, policing, policy-making, and clinical/health psychology but not so much in work and organizational psychology. Evidence-based practice involves making decisions through a combination of critical thinking and the use of more evidence (or information) of more diverse types and from more sources. First, I will consider barriers to evidence-based practice from our clients, academic practices, evidence-based practice myths, market forces, and the training of work and organizational psychologists. Second, some of the ethical and professional reasons why we should be more evidence-based will be discussed. Third, I will suggest several ways in which work and organizational psychology can perhaps become more evidence-based. These suggestions including changing the way we train work and organizational psychologists, making ourselves quite distinct from other organizational consultants, increasing the level of qualification required to practice, and sticking to our ethical codes of practice.

About Rob Briner

Rob was appointed Professor of Organizational Psychology at the School of Management, University of Bath in 2011 and previously worked at Birkbeck College, University of London for 19 years after completing his PhD at the MRC/ESRC Social and Applied Psychology Unit (now the Institute of Work Psychology). His research has focused on several topics including well-being, emotions, stress, ethnicity, the psychological contract, absence from work, motivation, work-nonwork and everyday work behaviour. Beyond academic research and teaching Rob is passionate about helping practitioners and organizations make better use of evidence, including research evidence, in decision-making as well as encouraging academics to make research more accessible. He has written for and presented to practitioners on many aspects of HR and organizational psychology and is now involved in many initiatives aimed at developing and promoting evidence-based organizational psychology and management. He is also a founding member, vice-chair and on the Academic Board of the Center for Evidence-Based Management.


Guido Hertel

Guido Hertel

The Internet at Work – How Digital Technologies (Might) Change Work Design and HRM
Internet und Arbeit – Wie digitale Technologien Arbeitsprozesse und Personalmanagement verändern

Summary

During the last 20 years, the commercial rise of the World Wide Web has caused fundamental changes in the way we communicate and interact with other people. These changes also affect the way we work, and how work processes are organized. Indeed, concepts such as e-leadership, e-recruiting, or virtual teamwork reflect the increasing influence of information technologies in almost all areas of work design and Human Resource Management. However, while initial psychological research has monitored and examined these newly evolving forms of work and work organization, more research is needed, and the existing research should be better integrated given the current distribution among very different outlets. In addition, academic research often lags way behind new technological developments in the field, requiring faster consideration of current and future trends.

In this keynote I will provide a review on the past and current developments in this exciting field, focusing both on changes as well as on challenges of digital technologies at work. In doing so, I will consider three different perspectives: The perspective of individual working persons affected by digitized collaboration media (e.g., work-life balance, work disruptions, cyber loafing, gamification, trust maintenance), the perspective of work organizations applying electronic human resource management tools (e.g., e-recruiting, e-leadership, e-learning, virtual collaboration, employee self-services), and the perspective of social societies dealing with various implications of these developments (e.g., sharing communities, Internet of things, flexibilities at the job market, challenges for social security systems). The results not only reveal promising areas for future research, but also the need for work, organizational, and business psychologists to initiate the development of digital media based on psychological requirements instead of mere reactions to evolving technological trends.

About Guido Hertel

Guido Hertel is Professor of Organizational and Business Psychology at the University of Münster (OWMs). His current research focusses on electronic human resource management, demographic changes in organizations, synergy effects of teamwork and cooperation, and negotiation research. This research has been funded by various grants from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Management, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Psychological Bulletin, Research Policy, among others. Guido is incoming Associate Editor of Group & Organization Management, and member of the Editorial Boards of Organizational Psychology Review, Small Group Research, and the International Journal of Internet Science. Moreover, he is consulting editor of the founding editorial board of Work, Aging, & Retirement, and has served as guest editor of special issues for various journals such as the European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology and the Journal of Managerial Psychology. In 2013, Guido was host (together with Heinz Holling) and program committee chair of the 16th EAWOP Congress in Münster. In addition to his academic activities, Guido also works as trainer and consultant for business organizations.


Bernad Batinic

Bernad Batinic

Digitalisierung von Arbeit und Forschung

Zusammenfassung

Die zunehmende Digitalisierung unseres Lebens versetzt in Erstaunen und zwar im Hinblick auf a) die Geschwindigkeit, in der sich diese Entwicklung vollzogen hat und nach wie vor sich vollzieht, b) die Bereiche und Themenfelder, welche digitalisiert werden und c) die Frage, was da in naher und ferner Zukunft noch kommen mag. Noch vor einigen Jahren kurios anmutende Online-Dienste sind heute vielversprechende Geschäftsmodelle. Technische Anwendungen sind entwickelt worden, welche größtmögliche Kontrolle und Transparenz erlauben. Daneben hat die Digitalisierung neue Berufe entstehen lassen, welche ohne das Internet gar nicht denkbar sind (z.B. den/die „Suchmaschinenoptimierer/in“, den/die „Communitymanager/in“) oder es wurden bestehende, traditionelle Berufe nachhaltig beeinflusst, beispielsweise in der Versicherungswirtschaft, wo aktuell Konzerne klassische Versicherungsvertreter zugunsten von Investitionen in Facebook und Online-Vertrieb massenhaft entlassen. Unsere Arbeit und unser Konsumverhalten haben sich nachhaltig verändert.

Die AOW-Psychologie hat auf diese Entwicklung reagiert, indem sie ihre Forschungsthemenfelder um den Aspekt „Neue Medien“ erweitert hat und dabei die Frage aufwirft, inwieweit bestehende traditionelle Modelle und Erkenntnisse unserer Disziplin noch ihre Gültigkeit haben bzw. zu modifizieren sind. Gleichzeitig setzen Kolleginnen und Kollegen vermehrt Neue Medien als Forschungsinstrument ein und dies nicht nur in der Phase der Datenerhebung, sondern in allen vor- und nachgelagerten Schritten des Forschungsprozesses. Meiner Ansicht nach erfassen wir die Bedeutung der Digitalisierung aber bisher nur Ausschnitthaft. Bedeutende, durch Neue Medien provozierte Veränderungen von Arbeit schenken wir nicht die nötige Aufmerksamkeit und zugleich nutzen wir nur einen geringen Teil des Potenzials von Neuen Medien in unserem Forschungsprozess. In dem Vortrag werde ich hier die aktuellen Möglichkeiten aufzeigen und zugleich einen Ausblick auf anstehende Entwicklungen der Digitalisierung geben.

Über Bernad Batinic

Prof. Bernad Batinic ist seit dem Jahr 2004 an der Universität Linz beschäftigt, dort Vorstand des Instituts für Pädagogik und Psychologie und Leiter der Abteilung für Arbeits-, Organisations- und Medienpsychologie. Psychologie studierte er an der Universität Gießen (1995) und promovierte (2001) bzw. habilitierte (2006) an der Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. Batinic gilt als ein Pionier der Online-Forschung. Neben Studien zur computer-vermittelten Kommunikation, Online-Personalauswahl, eLearning und Online-Feedbackverfahren, setzt er sich seit 1994 mit den Möglichkeiten zur internet-basierten Erhebung von Daten auseinander und führte auch die wohl erste WWW-Umfrage im deutschsprachigen Raum durch. Neben zahlreichen Publikationen, Kongressen, Workshops und Drittmittelprojekten sind aus diesen Arbeiten heraus auch mehrere Unternehmen aufgegangen (Globalpark, tivian und respondi), die Batinic mit gegründet hat und an denen er als Aufsichtsrat, Beirat oder Berater mitwirkt/e. Die genannten Firmen entwickeln Software für Online Befragungen und Online Panels (Globalpark / Questback), realisieren weltweite und sehr große Online Mitarbeiterbefragungen (tivian) und betreiben Online Panels in mehreren Ländern (respondi). Die Hochschulversion der Befragungssoftware von Globalpark, nämlich „unipark“, wird von vielen psychologischen Instituten eingesetzt. Mit seinem Team in Linz forscht Batinic darüber hinaus zum Zusammenhang zwischen Aspekten der Erwerbsarbeit und Wohlbefinden mit besonderer Berücksichtigung der latenten Funktionen von Arbeit nach Marie Jahoda.